Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year 1st May 2019 In the Wake of Handel, The impact of Handel on 300 years of British Culture by Peter Medhurst Despite his German birth and his Italian musical training, Handel remains one of the most important composers that England ever nurtured. Not only did his music have direct influence on his musical contemporaries, but his largerthan-life personality had a profound effect on the literary, visual and decorative arts as well – both in his lifetime and after his death, in 1759. By exploring the works of the French sculptor Roubiliac, the paintings of Hudson and Denner, the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, the novels of Samuel Butler, the Crystal Palace, the chimes of Westminster, as well as compositions by Sullivan and Tippett, the lecture assesses the cultural influences Handel had on a nation, as he once wrote, “from whom I have receiv’d so Generous a protection”. Music performed may include: Handel in the Strand – P Grainger, Tune Your Harps from Esther – GF Handel, My Voice Shalt Thou Hear Betimes, O Lord – J Corfe, This Helmet I Suppose was Meant to Ward off Blows from Princess Ida – AS Sullivan. Background to Handel’s life 5th June 2019 Adventures in 3 Dimensions, 20th Century sculpture in Britain by Justine Hopkins Modern sculpture is mysterious to many people, notoriously difficult and inaccessible both to look at and in the endless critical expositions which complicate more than they clarify. The works of Epstein, Moore, Hepworth, Frink and their contemporaries stand at the heart of our time, yet too often we are intimidated where we should be enthralled. The story of sculpture through the 20th century shows form manipulated to explore emotion as well as appearance, materials dictating meaning as well as shape and a three- dimensional language used as expressively as any poet or novelist to reveal the rhythms and meanings of life itself. The viewing of sculpture is an exploration, an adventure, something to be enjoyed. This lecture sets out to prove that we can all be explorers. 3rd July 2019 AGM please be seated by 10.30am Jennie Churchill - Winston’s American mother - Style icon or Ambitious Seductress. by Anne Sebba Jennie Churchill has been treated unfairly in history as a woman with 200 lovers but 2011, 90 years since Jennie’s tragically premature death, is surely the time to re-evaluate her legacy. In 1874, aged 20, American-born Jennie married Lord Randolph Churchill. When this ended in disaster she threw all her energies into her son Winston - her number one creative project. However, she had no income in an age when women were not expected to earn a living so indulged in various loss making projects until becoming an interior designer before the term was invented. History of Jennie Churchill
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year   1st May 2019 In the Wake of Handel, The impact of Handel on 300 years of British Culture by Peter Medhurst Despite his German birth and his Italian musical training, Handel remains one of the most important composers that England ever nurtured. Not only did his music have direct influence on his musical contemporaries, but his largerthan-life personality had a profound effect on the literary, visual and decorative arts as well – both in his lifetime and after his death, in 1759. By exploring the works of the French sculptor Roubiliac, the paintings of Hudson and Denner, the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, the novels of Samuel Butler, the Crystal Palace, the chimes of Westminster, as well as compositions by Sullivan and Tippett, the lecture assesses the cultural influences Handel had on a nation, as he once wrote, “from whom I have receiv’d so Generous a protection”. Music performed may include: Handel in the Strand – P Grainger, Tune Your Harps from Esther – GF Handel, My Voice Shalt Thou Hear Betimes, O Lord – J Corfe, This Helmet I Suppose was Meant to Ward off Blows from Princess Ida – AS Sullivan. Background to Handel’s life 5th June 2019 Adventures in 3 Dimensions, 20th Century sculpture in Britain by Justine Hopkins Modern sculpture is mysterious to many people, notoriously difficult and inaccessible both to look at and in the endless critical expositions which complicate more than they clarify. The works of Epstein, Moore, Hepworth, Frink and their contemporaries stand at the heart of our time, yet too often we are intimidated where we should be enthralled. The story of sculpture through the 20th century shows form manipulated to explore emotion as well as appearance, materials dictating meaning as well as shape and a three-dimensional language used as expressively as any poet or novelist to reveal the rhythms and meanings of life itself. The viewing of sculpture is an exploration, an adventure, something to be enjoyed. This lecture sets out to prove that we can all be explorers. 3rd July 2019 AGM please be seated by 10.30am Jennie Churchill - Winston’s American mother - Style icon or Ambitious Seductress. by Anne Sebba Jennie Churchill has been treated unfairly in history as a woman with 200 lovers but 2011, 90 years since Jennie’s tragically premature death, is surely the time to re- evaluate her legacy. In 1874, aged 20, American-born Jennie married Lord Randolph Churchill. When this ended in disaster she threw all her energies into her son Winston - her number one creative project. However, she had no income in an age when women were not expected to earn a living so indulged in various loss making projects until becoming an interior designer before the term was invented. History of Jennie Churchill
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training