Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year 6th February 2019 Eric Ravilious, his Life and Work by James Russell Eric Ravilious was only 39 when he died on active service as a war artist in 1942, yet he had already achieved amazing things. A brilliant wood engraver and designer, he is best known today for his haunting watercolours in which lighthouses, white horses, empty rooms and downland paths become marvels. Over the past decade I’ve explored many of these paintings in depth, teasing out stories and characters hidden in the wings. This entertaining illustrated talk illuminates the life and work of a playful, enigmatic artist, with plentiful examples of his work in watercolour, wood engraving, lithography and ceramics. The paintings are a delight, the Ravilious story funny, sad and full of surprises. Submarines in Dry Dock 1940 Tate page on Eric Ravilious. 6th March 2019 Popes and Painters The Avignon Papacy & the Impressionists of Provence by Caroline Rayman This is the story of two groups of people who were forced to find refuge in this beautiful corner of France. The first was a set of Popes, known as The Avignon Popes, escaping from frightening trouble in Rome, and the second a group of artists, known as The Impressionists, who were forced out of the Paris by the derision of the Salon, who similarly found peace and inspiration in Provence. Click here for the history of the Avignon Popes 3rd April 2019 The Language of Clothes, Visual Codes and Messages by Mary Alexander The Puritans viewed clothes as dangerous ‘tools of the devil’, whereas Louis XIV of France described fashion as ‘the mirror of history’. Whatever the historical context, clothing and fashion have been used to denote wealth and status, or to differentiate between social groups as fashion statement/antistatement and to display disaffection or affiliation, often interpreted through complex and subtle visual codes. This lecture encompasses a wide historical selection of paintings, male and female clothing, photographs and advertisements – ranging from the medieval sumptuary laws to the ubiquitous designer logo and corporate brand. Extracts from letters, journals and literature will be used throughout. An informative, entertaining and challenging ‘ideas’ lecture aimed at encouraging new ways of looking at clothing as a means of creative self expression in the visual arts. Background of how we view clothes 1st May 2019 In the Wake of Handel, The impact of Handel on 300 years of British Culture by Peter Medhurst Despite his German birth and his Italian musical training, Handel remains one of the most important composers that England ever nurtured. Not only did his music have direct influence on his musical contemporaries, but his largerthan-life personality had a profound effect on the literary, visual and decorative arts as well – both in his lifetime and after his death, in 1759. By exploring the works of the French sculptor Roubiliac, the paintings of Hudson and Denner, the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, the novels of Samuel Butler, the Crystal Palace, the chimes of Westminster, as well as compositions by Sullivan and Tippett, the lecture assesses the cultural influences Handel had on a nation, as he once wrote, “from whom I have receiv’d so Generous a protection”. Music performed may include: Handel in the Strand – P Grainger, Tune Your Harps from Esther – GF Handel, My Voice Shalt Thou Hear Betimes, O Lord – J Corfe, This Helmet I Suppose was Meant to Ward off Blows from Princess Ida – AS Sullivan. Background to Handel’s life 5th June 2019 Adventures in 3 Dimensions, 20th Century sculpture in Britain by Justine Hopkins Modern sculpture is mysterious to many people, notoriously difficult and inaccessible both to look at and in the endless critical expositions which complicate more than they clarify. The works of Epstein, Moore, Hepworth, Frink and their contemporaries stand at the heart of our time, yet too often we are intimidated where we should be enthralled. The story of sculpture through the 20th century shows form manipulated to explore emotion as well as appearance, materials dictating meaning as well as shape and a three-dimensional language used as expressively as any poet or novelist to reveal the rhythms and meanings of life itself. The viewing of sculpture is an exploration, an adventure, something to be enjoyed. This lecture sets out to prove that we can all be explorers. Kathlene by Jacob Epstein 3rd July 2019 AGM please be seated by 10.30am Jennie Churchill - Winston’s American mother - Style icon or Ambitious Seductress. by Anne Sebba Jennie Churchill has been treated unfairly in history as a woman with 200 lovers but 2011, 90 years since Jennie’s tragically premature death, is surely the time to re-evaluate her legacy. In 1874, aged 20, American-born Jennie married Lord Randolph Churchill. When this ended in disaster she threw all her energies into her son Winston - her number one creative project. However, she had no income in an age when women were not expected to earn a living so indulged in various loss making projects until becoming an interior designer before the term was invented. History of Jennie Churchill
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year   6th February 2019 Eric Ravilious, his Life and Work by James Russell Eric Ravilious was only 39 when he died on active service as a war artist in 1942, yet he had already achieved amazing things. A brilliant wood engraver and designer, he is best known today for his haunting watercolours in which lighthouses, white horses, empty rooms and downland paths become marvels. Over the past decade I’ve explored many of these paintings in depth, teasing out stories and characters hidden in the wings. This entertaining illustrated talk illuminates the life and work of a playful, enigmatic artist, with plentiful examples of his work in watercolour, wood engraving, lithography and ceramics. The paintings are a delight, the Ravilious story funny, sad and full of surprises. Submarines in Dry Dock 1940 Tate page on Eric Ravilious. 6th March 2019 Popes and Painters The Avignon Papacy & the Impressionists of Provence by Caroline Rayman This is the story of two groups of people who were forced to find refuge in this beautiful corner of France. The first was a set of Popes, known as The Avignon Popes, escaping from frightening trouble in Rome, and the second a group of artists, known as The Impressionists, who were forced out of the Paris by the derision of the Salon, who similarly found peace and inspiration in Provence. Click here for the history of the Avignon Popes 3rd April 2019 The Language of Clothes, Visual Codes and Messages by Mary Alexander The Puritans viewed clothes as dangerous ‘tools of the devil’, whereas Louis XIV of France described fashion as ‘the mirror of history’. Whatever the historical context, clothing and fashion have been used to denote wealth and status, or to differentiate between social groups as fashion statement/antistatement and to display disaffection or affiliation, often interpreted through complex and subtle visual codes. This lecture encompasses a wide historical selection of paintings, male and female clothing, photographs and advertisements – ranging from the medieval sumptuary laws to the ubiquitous designer logo and corporate brand. Extracts from letters, journals and literature will be used throughout. An informative, entertaining and challenging ‘ideas’ lecture aimed at encouraging new ways of looking at clothing as a means of creative self expression in the visual arts. Background of how we view clothes 1st May 2019 In the Wake of Handel, The impact of Handel on 300 years of British Culture by Peter Medhurst Despite his German birth and his Italian musical training, Handel remains one of the most important composers that England ever nurtured. Not only did his music have direct influence on his musical contemporaries, but his largerthan- life personality had a profound effect on the literary, visual and decorative arts as well – both in his lifetime and after his death, in 1759. By exploring the works of the French sculptor Roubiliac, the paintings of Hudson and Denner, the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, the novels of Samuel Butler, the Crystal Palace, the chimes of Westminster, as well as compositions by Sullivan and Tippett, the lecture assesses the cultural influences Handel had on a nation, as he once wrote, “from whom I have receiv’d so Generous a protection”. Music performed may include: Handel in the Strand – P Grainger, Tune Your Harps from Esther – GF Handel, My Voice Shalt Thou Hear Betimes, O Lord – J Corfe, This Helmet I Suppose was Meant to Ward off Blows from Princess Ida – AS Sullivan. Background to Handel’s life 5th June 2019 Adventures in 3 Dimensions, 20th Century sculpture in Britain by Justine Hopkins Modern sculpture is mysterious to many people, notoriously difficult and inaccessible both to look at and in the endless critical expositions which complicate more than they clarify. The works of Epstein, Moore, Hepworth, Frink  and their contemporaries stand at the heart of our time, yet too often we are intimidated where we should be enthralled. The story of sculpture through the 20th century shows form manipulated to explore emotion as well as appearance, materials dictating meaning as well as shape and a three-dimensional language used as expressively as any poet or novelist to reveal the rhythms and meanings of life itself. The viewing of sculpture is an exploration, an adventure, something to be enjoyed. This lecture sets out to prove that we can all be explorers. Kathleen by Epstein 3rd July 2019 AGM please be seated by 10.30am Jennie Churchill - Winston’s American mother - Style icon or Ambitious Seductress. by Anne Sebba Jennie Churchill has been treated unfairly in history as a woman with 200 lovers but 2011, 90 years since Jennie’s tragically premature death, is surely the time to re-evaluate her legacy. In 1874, aged 20, American-born Jennie married Lord Randolph Churchill. When this ended in disaster she threw all her energies into her son Winston - her number one creative project. However, she had no income in an age when women were not expected to earn a living so indulged in various loss making projects until becoming an interior designer before the term was invented. History of Jennie Churchill
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training